Sexing By Feeling the Pelvic Bone?
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Sexing By Feeling the Pelvic Bone? Expand / Collapse
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Posted 5/3/2011 12:05:01 PM
Fledgling

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Hi all,

I know that I am new to keeping birds and not experienced by any means. However, after talking to one individual breeder he began to show me how to sex the bird by feeling the pelvic bone. Any advice on how to sex lovebirds by feeling the pelvic bone or what I should be looking for?

Sam,
Post #235723
Posted 5/3/2011 3:18:07 PM


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Only a vet should do this. Bird's bones are EXTREMELY fragile and there is a certain way you are supposed to do this. Plus, it is not always accurate. You should just take the bird to the vet if you want to know the sex. It's better safe than sorry!

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Post #235729
Posted 5/3/2011 4:40:29 PM


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The theory is that if the pelvic bones are wide apart, then it is a female. They are wider to allow the egg to be laid. It is very hard to tell unless you happen to have a known male to compare her to. The difference is subtle.

We used to try to "guess" for customers at the pet shop. Sometimes we were right, sometimes not. We did it to the Cockatiels, but I don't know if it is the same for Lovies.

  
 LoLei & La Vena
Post #235731
Posted 5/3/2011 7:40:43 PM
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I have heard of this also. But, it is unreliable. Birds bones are fragile, so, be very careful if you use this method.

Bill...It is no coincidence that birds and angels both have wings.
Post #235733
Posted 5/3/2011 11:15:52 PM


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yes, a wider pelvic bone is thought to be a female also a bird with a super round head can be a female, males tend to have more flat heads. But none of these are sure ways to tell, we thought we had a male Pionus once due to a flat head but our "little boy" turned out to be a "she".

The best way to tell is to have a vet do a nail clip, clipping the nail a little too short. My vet said it is the least painful way for a bird and easiest to stop the bleeding. We have had 4 parrots that we wanted to know the sex on and all of these procedures went smoothly.



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Post #235746
Posted 5/4/2011 3:04:11 AM


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It's not at all an accurate way to sex birds, lovebirds included. You can get the same sort of accuracy by going along going 'boy, girl, boy, girl'. Pelvic bones are determined by age, nutrition, weather a female has bred - it's just not accurate.

Many an old time breeder (or those younger who have grown up with them!) swear by this method, despite every qualified bird vet including the country's most widely recognized bird vet, saying it's all but worthless :P




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Post #235750
Posted 5/4/2011 4:45:04 AM


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From everything I've heard and read, this is not an accurate method for identifying the sex of birds.

I'd recommend you have your birds DNA used to verify their sex for an accurate and correct determination. I had my vet do it with Pepper and there are also DYI kits (here's one: http://www.dnasexing.com/) for doing it.

Good luck.



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Post #235754
Posted 5/4/2011 6:51:05 AM


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It seems to me the "best" way to get blood is to have an a-vet draw blood from the jugular vein in the neck. (obv) Done correctly, there is no bleeding after the needle is removed. Of course, this is best if you need to get blood taken anyways for tests.

Another method I've heard is to remove blood from the flesh right above the toenail - which, to me, sounds quite painful, but apparently it's what they do in Europe? (someone correct me if I'm wrong!)

If you are doing it yourself, and using blood, then yes, clipped a nail a tad too short would probably be the best way to go, unless your bird accidently breaks a blood feather, in which case, you can send that! Otherwise, it's plucking 3-6 feathers (usually breast feathers) for feather sexing.

 

Everything else - I agree with the previous responses.

Post #235759
Posted 5/4/2011 7:02:52 AM


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The sources that I trust have always recommended clipping a toenail a little short to get a drop of blood for DNA. Here in Orlando, my bird store has DNA kits with a special paper card, sterile bag, and envelope. You mail off the sample and a week later you get the results. Both of my birds got their DNA testing done this way. It doesn't hurt the bird at all.

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Post #235760
Posted 5/4/2011 9:34:21 AM


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Parrotz (5/4/2011)
The sources that I trust have always recommended clipping a toenail a little short to get a drop of blood for DNA. ----- It doesn't hurt the bird at all.

Please tell that to Charlie! Any time I mess with his nails, he has a royal screaming fit! And I don't normally trim them to short, either... Doesn't matter if I use some sort of clippers or a dremel.... although, I haven't tried a fail on his, either (don't have a metal one which would probably be best, for sterilization reasons, I would think)

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